Info
Info

Organic Solar Hits New Landmark

News

Experts are starting to believe that the future of solar energy lies not in silicon, but in organic solar cells"”also known as organic photovoltaics (OPV). OPVs, which are made from carbon and plastic, are cheaper to make and have far more flexible engineering applications.

OPVs can be made with compounds that are dissolvible in ink, which is then printed on to a diverse range of materials. This allows engineers to build semi-transparent solar cells into windowpanes, bend them to build on the roofs of aesthetically pleasing architecture and even put them into glasses' lenses for users to solar charge their phone on the go.

Despite the advantages, OPVs aren't normally used in solar energy on account of their low efficiency rates. Where silicon photovoltaics convert between 18 to 22 percent of solar energy into electricity, OPVs have only been able to achieve half that rate.

Researchers have been making big leaps toward higher-efficiency OPVs this year. In April, a team from the University of Michigan broke records with a commercially viable cell that boasted 15 percent efficiency, comparable to some of the silicon cells on the market.

The Chinese team's results, which were published last week in Science, were achieved by rethinking OPVs from the ground up. The team applied a tandem cell system, meaning that they built two solar cell devices in the same structure to target two different wavelengths of sunlight, thereby increasing the yield.

"We have two layers of active materials; each layer can absorb different wavelengths of light. That means you can use sunlight in the wider wavelengths more efficiently, and this can generate more current," said Yongshen Chen, PhD, who led the study.

Chen believes the results mean that solar cells using the tandem solution may be on the market in under five years, as the commercial materials are already widely available. According to him, OPVs are similar to organic light-emitting diodes, which are currently used in high-end TVs.

Kia And Hyundai Reveal Solar Charging Technology To Power Eco-friendly Vehicles
Hanwha Q CELLS Supplies Half-cell Modules To Largest Hotel Solar Installation In Stockholm
ABB Microgrid To Support Portuguese Island’s Energy Transition
The Biggest Solar Show In Ireland 27-28 November
ENGIE Signs 25-year PPA With Senegalese Government For Two Solar Projects
Kia And Hyundai Plans To Introduce ‘solar Roof’ Charging Technology
Schletter Group: 1MW Rooftop Project In Jordan On The Grid
Minimal Carbon Footprint From Midsummer CIGS Process
New Minister And New Start For Solar In Ireland
Flea-sized Solar Panels Embedded In Clothes Can Charge A Mobile Phone
NREL Identifies Where New Solar Technologies Can Be Flexible
Hanwha Q CELLS Launches Scalable Energy Storage System In Germany
Hanwha Q CELLS’ Deliver Exceptional Performance In Fraunhofer CSP Test
Midsummer Continues Strong Growth
University Aims For A Brighter Future With ABB Solar Solutions
SOLARWATT In-roof Solar Panel Wins 2019 German Design Award
BayWa R.e. And LONGi Solar Sign Global Framework Agreement
Ascent CIGS Technology Goes Into Space
Korean Renewable Energy Potential Takes Centre Stage
Eco Energy World Reach Financial Close On 54 MW Of Merchant Solar Projects In Australia
Cabot Microelectronics Completes Acquisition Of KMG Chemicals
Joint Research By Fraunhofer ISE And Heraeus For High-performance Solar Modules
ENGIE Signs 25-year PPA With Senegalese Government For Two Solar Projects
New Innovative Solar Light Connecting Off-grid Population

Info
×
Search the news archive

To close this popup you can press escape or click the close icon.
Logo
×
Logo
×
Register - Step 1

You may choose to subscribe to the Solar + Power Magazine, the Solar + Power Newsletter, or both. You may also request additional information if required, before submitting your application.


Please subscribe me to:

 

You chose the industry type of "Other"

Please enter the industry that you work in:
Please enter the industry that you work in:
 
X
Info
X
Info